Mono/Poly Performs at the Digital Worlds Institute's REVE

On Saturday, April 28 at 8:00pm, the contemporary musical duet, MONO/POLY, performed at the Digital Worlds Institute REVE Theatre. The music of Mono/Poly draws inspiration from contemporary and avant-garde music, pop, electronic, and found sounds.  This show, a collaboration between Mono/Poly and the digital video artists at UF's Digital Worlds Institute, featured music that covered all of these genres and more.

Mono/Poly is an US electro-acoustic duo of saxophone and electronics. Made up of composer and electronics guru Nate Bliton and saxophonist and turntablist Geoff Deibel, this unique ensemble strives to create concert experiences built around contemporary musical works that also utilize different types of media. What Mono/Poly finds particularly compelling about electro-acoustical music is that you are forced to redefine the space you inhabit as a listener. The performance becomes more real to listeners because the expectations and knowledge they have of sound sources is redefined--whether it's the saxophone or keyboard, they are guaranteed to be taken on a journey of a multitude of soundscapes. The music of Mono/Poly draws inspiration from contemporary and avant-garde music, pop, electronic, and found sounds. This show was a collaboration between Mono/Poly and the digital video artists at UF's Digital Worlds Institute, and featured music that covered all of these genres and more.

"VIV" was written by Korean-born composer Junghae Lee, who has lived and worked in Basel, Switzerland for many years. The piece takes the saxophone and redefines the instrument as an acoustic object and sound source; key clicks, tongue slaps, multiphonics and other extended techniques make use of the saxophone's many physical possibilities as an instrument. "Man was proud", written by Mono/Poly's Nate Bliton, deals with creation myths, and is influenced by pop music. The audience at the REVE heard live sampling, lots of indeterminacy in electronics, and live processing of voice and sax, making both sound like recordings from different ages. "Aphasia," by US composer Jesse Ronneau, (who currently teaches in Ireland) deals with time and memory in music. The work musically explores the sensations that result from brain damage, moving from unfocused multiphonics that wash over the listener, to snap shots of the live saxophone that repeat and reappear at various times during the piece, recalling earlier moments of the work. The ability of the listener to locate oneself through aural memory is challenged throughout, as the saxophone sound becomes transformed through electronic support over the course of the work. "New York Counter-point" is perhaps the most traditional work on the program, and is Mono/Poly's arrangement of a classic contemporary work by minimalist composer Steve Reich.  Instead of being performed by a soloist with 11 pre-recorded saxophones, in this arrangement, Mono/Poly created and looped live all of the music lines. Rather than utilizing pre-recorded sound sources, all sounds were generated by the live performers.